4M Knowledge base - papers

An integrated all-optical microfluidic particle sorter

S. Valkai, H. I. Kirei, L. Oroszi and P. Ormos
Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary

Abstract

A fully integrated microfluidic sorter is introduced. It is able to count, characterize and sort micrometer sized articles and cells. All functions of the device are performed by light. The objects to be sorted are counted optically, they are characterized by measuring their fluorescence. Even the sorting itself, directing the particles into different channels is performed by the pressure of light. The device is built by photopolymerization, from a light cured optically clear resin upon a glass plate support. The whole structure is created in a single photolithography step. The microfluidic channels and optical waveguides that carry the illuminating, detecting and sorting light form a single integrated structure. The supporting units, like sample reservoirs, pumps, light sources, light detectors are easily connected to the device from the outside. The device is optimized for simplicity. It is a proof-of-concept instrument, it demonstrates that it is possible to build simple optically driven microfluidic systems that perform complicated functions.

Submitted on August 6, 2008 - 15:16.

An Investigation on Development of MEMS in LTCC by Embossing Technique

D. Andrijasevic(a), W. Smetana(a), S. Zoppel(b), W. Brenner(a)
a: Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna, Austria
b: Forschungszentrum Mikrotechnik, Fachhochschule Vorarlberg, 6850 Dornbirn, Austria

The latest results achieved during the investigation of possibilities for producing MEMS in unfired green Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) by embossing technique are presented in this paper. Ceramic tapes in unfired state are subjected to compression by means of using tools specially designed and developed for this purpose. Structures obtained in this way demonstrate high repeatability and surface quality comparable with those gained by other techniques. In comparison with traditionally used laser cutting or injection moulding for ceramic processing, this technique offers better resolution and further miniaturisation, improved rigidity of small structures and possibility to profile the vertical walls in U- and V-shapes. The main focus of this paper will be on the optimisation of embossing parameters (embossing force, embossing time and temperature) in order to get repeatable and reliable results. Structures produced in this way could be successfully used in optical as well as in medical applications.

Submitted on November 12, 2007 - 16:23.

categories

ceramics | Hot/UV embossing

Analysis of Micro-Structuring Polymer Replication by Micro-Injection Moulding and Hot Embossing

M. Sahli(a)(b)(c), C. Millot(a), C. Roques-Carmes(a), C. Khan Malek(b), J.C. Gelin(c) and T. Barriere(c)
a: Surface Microanalysis Laboratory (LMS), ENSMM, 25030 Besançon cedex, France
b: FEMTO-ST Institute/Dpt. LPMO, CNRS UMR 6174, , 25044 Besançon cedex, France
c: FEMTO-ST Institute, CNRS UMR 6174, ENSMM, 25030 Besançon cedex, France

Abstract

This paper focuses on the comparison between two manufacturing techniques to realize micro-structural replications on a polymer substrate. The micro-technologies that are considered consist in replication through micro-injection moulding on one hand, and in replication through hot embossing in the other hand. The same mould with microstructured cavities produced by high-speed milling or indentation was used for both replication methods. The replication process parameters are analyzed in both cases, and the resulting polymeric shapes and surface states are characterized in using 3D scanning mechanical microscopy. It is shown that both replication processes give accurate results if the processing cycle as well as pressure and temperature are well adapted.

Submitted on November 12, 2007 - 16:23.

categories

Hot/UV embossing | LIGA | polymers

Application of Different Process Chains for Polymer Microfluidics Fabrication including Hybrid Tooling Technology

G. Tosello(a), B. Fillon(b), S. Azcarate(c), A. Schoth(d), L. Mattsson(e), C. Griffiths(f), L. Staemmler(g), P.J. Bolt(h)
a: Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management (IPL), 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
b: French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Laboratory of Innovation for New Energy Technologies and Nanomaterials (LITEN), 38054 Grenoble, France
c: Tekniker Technological Center, 20600 Eibar, Spain
d: University of Freiburg, Institute of Microsystem Technology (IMTEK), 79110 Freiburg, Germany
e: School of Industrial Technology and Management (KTH), Department of Production Engineering, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
f: Cardiff University, Manufacturing Engineering Center (MEC), Cardiff CF 24 3AA, UK
g: Hahn-Schickard-Gesellschaft, Institute for Micro Assembly Technology (HSG-IMAT), 70174 Stuttgart, Germany
h: TNO Science & Industry, 5600 HE Eindhoven, The Nederlands

Abstract

This paper is based on the Division 4 “Processing of Polymers” activities within the 4M NoE “Multi-Material Micro Manufacturing”. To overpass limitations of the current existing micro tooling capabilities, a new generation of micro hybrid tooling technologies for micro replication was developed. A metrological approach was applied to standardize the employed tooling processes (μ-milling, μ-EDM, laser μ-machining, electrochemical μ-milling). The micro tools were then tested with different polymers. The paper provides a comparison of these technologies concerning obtainable feature sizes, surface finishing, and aspect ratios of both micro tools and micro moulded parts.

Submitted on November 12, 2007 - 16:23.

Application of EDM to the Production of Micro Tooling

A. Herrero(a), J. Esmoris(a), S. Azcarate(a), S. Geissdoerfer(b), U. Engel(b)
a: Department of Micro & Nano Technologies, Tekniker, Avda. Otaola 20, 20600 Eibar, Spain
b: Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Egerlandstrasse 11, 91058 Erlangen, Germany

Abstract

The mass production of micro and meso scale products made of polymers or metals is intimately related to the production of high quality microtooling in stable materials capable to provide an accurate and repetitive performance throughout the whole demanded production. As it is widely known, the WEDM process provides high accuracy but is conceptually limited to the production of ruled features. The SEDM process can be a complement to this aspect but the electrodes must be manufactured by other technologies like WEDM, micromilling, turning, etc. Given the importance of several parameters like dimensional accuracy, tooling material for the different replication processes or tooling production technology, the present paper introduces some tests performed by the 4M Metals Workgroup. The analysis of some components manufactured by members of the group is presented discussing the influence of the EDM process on the machined tooling components and the consequent influence on the replication process.

Submitted on November 12, 2007 - 16:23.

minam fp6
Copyright© 4M Network of Excellence.